NEWS & EVENTS

Media Resources

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In The News

FeedMore’s Mobile Pantry delivers food to Emporia

Feb. 18, 2015 • The Emporia News

   Linda Thomas described Friday's visit from the FeedMore mobile food bank and a way to "bridge the gap" for those that do not qualify for food stamps. Linda and her husband Javon feel so strongly about giving back to the community that they were both volunteers on Friday. Linda, a self-described contributor to the Food Bank for the last 24 years, has been volunteering for the last few months and described her experience:  "The first few years I got food from the Pantry - when I was a single Mom. Then God blessed me and I was able to start giving. A few months ago my Husband and I started volunteering."

   While the Mobile Food Bank distribution was not scheduled to start until 10:00, many people were lined up and waiting when the truck pulled in and set up began.  Hundreds of people were pre-qualified for the event and tons of food were distributed.  Friday's selection included Organic Salad Greens and frozen poultry to augment the typical canned and boxed food usually seen at food banks.  According to Eric Miller with FeedMore, there is an effort to provide more fresh produce and nutritious foodstuffs.  In an e-mail, Eric described the Mobile Pantry as a "refrigerated truck that delivers canned and boxed food and perishables to neighbors who live in areas with limited access to healthy and affordable food options, also known as 'food deserts'.” Emporia is among the top five cities in Virginia for food insecurity."

   Emporia lacks a bus system, and is not pedestrian friendly, lacking even sidewalks for the last stretch of the walk to either Food Lion or WalMart. Residents who have no transportation must rely on cabs to travel to Walmart and other stores to buy food. A cab fare is often $10 one way and that amounts to $20 that might have bought 20 cans of protein-rich beans, said Dorothy Prince of Emporia, a volunteer at the Mobile Pantry distribution site.

   Diane, an Emporia client of the Mobile Pantry, walked two miles to the Mobile Pantry. Fortunately, she found a cab driver who would transport her and her two hefty bags of canned and perishable food to her home for $5. She receives $53 a month in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits, and the once-a-month visits to Emporia from the Mobile Pantry are a big help, she said.

   A few minutes after Diane left, the cab driver returned and took Eunice and Tara to their Emporia home for $5. The friendly cab driver said he would charge them only $5, adding, “I ain’t trying to get rich. Just trying to make a living.”

   “There are so many people around here that are hungry,” said Marilyn Williams of Jarratt, a volunteer who hopes to open a food pantry at her church, Salem Baptist of Emporia.
 

Meals on Wheels Delivers Food, Love and Care to Needy Seniors

Feb. 13, 2015 • ABC 8News

   Five days a week, 52 weeks a year, FeedMore’s Community Kitchen on Westmoreland Avenue is buzzing with activity.

   This is where Meals on Wheels gets rolling.

   “We prepare and deliver fresh, homemade, made from scratch, really tasty meals to home bound seniors who are not able to get out and buy groceries or cook for themselves,” said FeedMore’s Director of Development Kathy Erhardt.

   Covering 93 routes across five cities and 10 counties, Meals on Wheels serves more than a thousand people a day. That includes sick folks with conditions like renal failure or hypertension.

   “Up to 14 different therapeutic meals,” Erhardt added.

   And today, everyone’s meal includes special Valentine’s Day flowers, cards and placemats. Dedicated volunteers like Jean Collins make this Herculean task look easy.
“Oh, it’s absolutely wonderful,” Collins said. “I thoroughly enjoy it. I know these people need the food.”

   Jenny Griffin is a driver who volunteers because, “food is such a basic human need. And there are many people who need the services of Meals on Wheels. This allows those seniors to be able to stay in their own homes and age in place.”
 

Mobile food bank comes to King and Queen

Feb. 11, 2015 • Tidewater Review

By Jackson McMillan

   KING AND QUEEN – Pausing only for a moment to offer a basic explanation of the group's operation, Davey Jones, a volunteer with the Feed More Mobile Pantry, waved an outstretched hand over a portion of the 3 1/2 tons of food items being readied for distribution. "Our goal is to get rid of all — or most — of this today," Jones said, nodding to the stacks of bottled water, Nilla Wafer cookies and boxes of Pop-Tarts.

   Feed More Inc. is a Richmond based nonprofit that partners with more than 300 food pantries and soup kitchens in 31 counties and five cities in Central Virginia. Together they distribute more than 22 million pounds of food annually, serving more than 213,000 seniors, families and children each year. Feed More is also the distributor of 4.5 million pounds of produce, which makes up 15 percent of its annual food distribution. The mobile pantry distributes on the first Wednesday of every other month in King and Queen County regardless of weather conditions.

   Clients who receive food from the mobile pantry are pre-qualified to receive food through their local social services departments. Waiting for their share of the harvest last week were more than 200 individuals or families. Their ranks were diverse; the line they formed on the shady green lawn at Mitzpah United Methodist Church in Walkerton showed no consistency, no favor.

   Hunger was the only common characteristic among members of the group. Among the elderly was 91-year old Charles Chamberlain, of King and Queen County, who sat in a plastic folding chair with his cane between his knees. He said although this was only his second or third trip to the mobile pantry, he was appreciative of the service they provide. "I appreciate the food," Chamberlain said. "I couldn't do any better than this as far as I'm concerned."

Press Releases

Four teens go on a food shopping spree with Virginia First Lady Dorothy McAuliffe

February 23, 2015 • FeedMore

    Four teens went on a food shopping spree with Virginia First Lady Dorothy McAuliffe at Walmart on Feb. 19 and then donated the food to FeedMore.
    Searching the Walmart shelves for low-sodium beans, peanut butter, water-based tuna and canned fruit in juice, the affable First Lady worked closely with the four teens, who are also Virginia Senate Pages. The teens who went on the $500 shopping spree were Raegan Johnson of Hampton, Claire Melton of Bristol, Steven Williams Jr. of Charles City and Liana Keesing of McLean. This was the Pages’ community service project, said Bladen Finch, Senate Page Program director. They donated 829 pounds of food and an additional $5,485.
    “I’m really excited that they are thinking about other kids their age and spending their dollars wisely” by purchasing low-sodium beans and protein items, such as tuna and peanut butter, Mrs. McAuliffe said while in the Walmart in Short Pump, Va. “They are very thoughtful about how they are spending the money.

Diverse group shows up for Mobile Pantry food distribution

February 4, 2015

Over 7,000 pounds of food was given away in the rural community of Walkerton by FeedMore’s Mobile Pantry truck on Feb. 4.
Over 200 clients lined up on the front lawn of a 135-year-old structure—Mizpah United Methodist Church—in King and Queen County. Standing in line together was a diverse group. Some carried canes and some were in their 80s and some in their 90s. What brought them all together under the bright blue sky was a need for food.
Ninety-one year old Charles Chamberlain drove himself to the Mobile Pantry in his faded blue 1992 Cadillac. A heavy-equipment operator for 50 years, he sat in a folding chair with his cane and waited as 17 volunteers hurriedly packed paper grocery bags with an assortment of canned food, boxed food and perishables and set them on the lawn where clients could walk up and carry away two bags of groceries.
Chamberlain said he was thankful for the Mobile Pantry, which visits his community every other month. “I appreciate the food,” Charles said. “I couldn’t do any better than this as far as I’m concerned.”  He lives alone in a house and is thankful his children visit him and call him regularly.
Standing in line, Benjamin Moore, 57, of King William County, said he is a self-employed roofer and painter but business has been slow. Plus he has done some $1,500 roofing jobs for less than half price. Referring to the two bags of food, he said, “This will last a couple of weeks.”

FeedMore’s Mobile Pantry distributes tons of food in Emporia

January 23, 2015

    Tons of much needed food was given out for free in one of Virginia’s most food insecure cities, Emporia, on Jan. 23, thanks to FeedMore’s Mobile Pantry.
    The Mobile Pantry is a refrigerated truck that delivers canned and boxed food and perishables to neighbors who live in areas with limited access to healthy and affordable food options, also known as “food deserts.” Emporia is among the top five food-insecure cities in Virginia. The Mobile Pantry goes to 14 food deserts in urban areas and feeds 5,000 each month.
    Emporia lacks a bus system, and residents who have no transportation must rely on cabs to travel to stores to buy food. A cab fare is often $10 one way and that amounts to $20 that might have bought 20 cans of protein-rich beans, said Dorothy Prince of Emporia, a volunteer at the Mobile Pantry distribution site.

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